A Dark Corporate Web

From the AFL-CIO

Corporate CEOs and the wealthy elite hope a ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Janus v. AFSCME, Council 31, will bleed America’s labor unions of precious resources that help fight for working people.

A bad decision that limits or eliminates fair share fees will further stack the deck in favor of the wealthy few, but America’s working people aren’t waiting on any politician or judge to decide our fate. We’re building a movement to write new economic rules to create broadly shared prosperity.

The Supreme Court will soon issue a decision in Janus v. AFSCME, Council 31, which is part of a multipronged attack on the freedoms of working people by the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, a front group funded by corporate billionaires.

On paper, the case was brought by Mark Janus, an Illinois state employee, against his union, which empowers him and his co-workers to negotiate for higher wages and better benefits and is legally required to represent him if he is mistreated by his employer.

But in reality, Janus has been driven entirely by a dark web of corporations and wealthy donors who want to destroy unions and silence working people.

IIn anticipation of a ruling from the Supreme Court that undermines working people, the billionaire Koch brothers and the owners of Walmart have dumped at least $80 million into an outreach plan to persuade teachers and other public union members to stop paying fair share fees. t’s a cynical, targeted and sophisticated campaign.

America’s working people are on the rise, and the Supreme Court can’t stop us. We will continue to build power to win a new set of economic rules so all of us can get ahead.

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Posted In: From AFL-CIO, Union Matters

Union Matters

He Gets the Bucks, We Get All the Deadly Bangs

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

National Rifle Association chief Wayne LaPierre has had better weeks. First came the horrific early August slaughters in California, Texas, and Ohio that left dozens dead, murders that elevated public pressure on the NRA’s hardline against even the mildest of moves against gun violence. Then came revelations that LaPierre — whose labors on behalf of the nonprofit NRA have made him a millionaire many times over — last year planned to have his gun lobby group bankroll a 10,000-square-foot luxury manse near Dallas for his personal use. In response, LaPierre had his flacks charge that the NRA’s former ad agency had done the scheming to buy the mansion. The ad agency called that assertion “patently false” and related that LaPierre had sought the agency’s involvement in the scheme, a request the agency rejected. The mansion scandal, notes the Washington Post, comes as the NRA is already “contending with the fallout from allegations of lavish spending by top executives.”

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Corruption Coordinates

Corruption Coordinates