Ford Is About to Start Cranking Out Rangers in Michigan

Matthew McMullan

Matthew McMullan Communications Manager, Alliance for American Manufacturing

The Ranger is coming back to United States, and it’s almost here.

The Detroit Free Press had the story a few days ago about how the Ford Motor Company and the United Autoworkers worked together to bring the iconic truck’s production to southwest Michigan:

In the spring of 2015, Joe Hinrichs (president of global operations at Ford) and then-UAW President Dennis Williams, and Williams' executive administrative assistant, Chuck Browning, met for a private lunch near the Detroit airport.

Hinrichs asked how labor might feel if Ford moved production of the Ford Focus sedan from Michigan to Mexico, and then retooled Wayne Assembly to build SUVs. The plan would need to be part of an upcoming labor contract, and Ford didn’t want to make the move without knowing if the UAW might support it.

“They were very supportive,” Hinrichs said. “They knew the workforce would love building the Ranger and Bronco again. So, we ended up making it part of the 2015 negotiations. This is a great story of collaboration between Ford and the UAW.”

That collaboration is about to pay off. After retooling its Michigan Assembly Plant and an afternoon of festivities in its parking lot …

… final assembly workers will return on Monday and start churning these trucks out.

Ford’s been promoting its new vehicles (there’s a new Escape and Explorer, too) with an ad campaign featuring Heisenberg himself, Bryan Cranston:

Posted In: Allied Approaches, From Alliance for American Manufacturing

Union Matters

He Gets the Bucks, We Get All the Deadly Bangs

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

National Rifle Association chief Wayne LaPierre has had better weeks. First came the horrific early August slaughters in California, Texas, and Ohio that left dozens dead, murders that elevated public pressure on the NRA’s hardline against even the mildest of moves against gun violence. Then came revelations that LaPierre — whose labors on behalf of the nonprofit NRA have made him a millionaire many times over — last year planned to have his gun lobby group bankroll a 10,000-square-foot luxury manse near Dallas for his personal use. In response, LaPierre had his flacks charge that the NRA’s former ad agency had done the scheming to buy the mansion. The ad agency called that assertion “patently false” and related that LaPierre had sought the agency’s involvement in the scheme, a request the agency rejected. The mansion scandal, notes the Washington Post, comes as the NRA is already “contending with the fallout from allegations of lavish spending by top executives.”

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Corruption Coordinates

Corruption Coordinates