Headed Outdoors This Summer? Check Out These 10 Made in USA Companies

Graham Turner Intern, AAM

Memorial Day Weekend is almost upon us, and as the weather warms up, people across the country are gearing up for some outdoor fun. Whether it’s summiting the nearest peak or simply relaxing at the park, here are some outdoor products to kickstart your summer, all made by companies that support local manufacturing and job creation.

New York's Nalgene is a maker of iconic water bottles that have a strong connection to adventure and the outdoors. These bottles come in many shapes and colors, and are billed as indestructible. So, no worries if you drop one down off the face of a cliff — it should be good as new once you get back to ground level.

Allegiance Footwear crafts incredibly durable boots for field, farm, and fashion. Proudly made in Mountain City, Tenn., all the company's products are labeled as Made in USA.

If you’re looking for a one-stop-shop online store, check out Cascade Designs. This brand is based in Seattle, born out of the ashes of Boeing’s massive worker layoff in 1971. They’re now a parent to a handful of outdoor-focused companies, including the mega-outfitter MSR.

If relaxing in the great outdoors with a good book is more your speed, look no further than Hummingbird Hammocks. This Alamo, Tenn. maker creates ultra-lightweight hammocks that are perfect for stringing up anywhere, anytime. They’ll fit easily in crowded backpack, and can support a LOT of weight.

Exxel Outdoors is an outfitter for camping and backpacking. On top of their tents and packs, Exxel owns the largest sleeping bag factory in America. Located in Haleyville, Ala., the facility produces the bulk of the signature sleeping bags they offer. You might recall that Exxel was featured in 2017 on our Manufacturing Report podcast — check it out here

Ever been afraid to take your favorite sunglasses hiking out of fear of losing them? Chums from Utah has you covered, making eyewear accessories and retainers that have become synonymous with their brand name. Selling a wide range of styles, materials, and colors, Chums even makes floating retainers ideal for fishing and boating trips.

Duckworth is an ethically sourced wool clothing company out of Montana. This team manages the production of their materials through every step of the process, and know their wool better than I know myself. No sheep is left unshorn here, as Duckworth bolsters an extensive product line of underwear, outerwear, and accessories.

Vermont based Darn Tough sells ultra-durable socks for all kinds of activities. From hiking, to cycling, to working, Darn Tough has the perfect pair for any and all of your needs.

Duluth Pack from Duluth, Minn. has been handcrafting canvas and leather bags since 1882. Backed by a lifetime guarantee and the workmanship of a skilled American craftsman, Duluth has designed numerous styles for the outdoors and day-to-day life.

Lastly, for the hardcore adventurer, Oru Kayak is a high-end coastal kayak manufacturer originating in San Francisco. These boats are durable, made eco-friendly with recyclable materials, and can fold like origami to fit in your closet. After Kickstarter campaigns, a Shark Tank endorsement, and thousands of sales, Oru is redefining the kayaking industry. Oru also been featured on the Discovery Channel.

Posted In: Allied Approaches, From Alliance for American Manufacturing

Union Matters

He Gets the Bucks, We Get All the Deadly Bangs

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

National Rifle Association chief Wayne LaPierre has had better weeks. First came the horrific early August slaughters in California, Texas, and Ohio that left dozens dead, murders that elevated public pressure on the NRA’s hardline against even the mildest of moves against gun violence. Then came revelations that LaPierre — whose labors on behalf of the nonprofit NRA have made him a millionaire many times over — last year planned to have his gun lobby group bankroll a 10,000-square-foot luxury manse near Dallas for his personal use. In response, LaPierre had his flacks charge that the NRA’s former ad agency had done the scheming to buy the mansion. The ad agency called that assertion “patently false” and related that LaPierre had sought the agency’s involvement in the scheme, a request the agency rejected. The mansion scandal, notes the Washington Post, comes as the NRA is already “contending with the fallout from allegations of lavish spending by top executives.”

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Corruption Coordinates

Corruption Coordinates