It’s July 2018, And There’s No Movement on Infrastructure Legislation

Matthew McMullan

Matthew McMullan Communications Manager, Alliance for American Manufacturing

Last week, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi joined Rep. Dan Kildee and other House Democrats for a tour of ongoing water infrastructure repair projects in Flint, Michigan.

Earlier that day, Pelosi and Kildee (who represents Flint) published an opinion that used the Flint Water Crisis as a jumping-off point. It’s title: “Let Flint serve as a warning: Congress must to do more to improve the nation’s infrastructure.”

“The hard truth is, what happened to Flint is not an isolated event. Many other America’s cities and towns are just one mistake away from a similar crisis. What happened to Flint is not an anomaly—rather, it’s a warning to other communities across the country that we must get serious about repairing our aging infrastructure.”

This is not new. It’s becoming old hat to cite the regular report cards from the American Society of Civil Engineers that turn in terrible grades for the country’s public underpinnings. And polling shows people are very much O.K. with spending public money on public transportation infrastructure – indicative of what they feel about other infrastructure, like those for energy and water. 

But there has been little political appetite to tackle our evegreen infrastructure problem.

One (retiring) congressman, House Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-Pa.), plans to shortly put forth an infrastructure bill for consideration, but he admits it’s to start discussion for next year. “He has acknowledged enacting a major bill in the second half of an election year would be tough,” reports Roll Call. “Floor time and congressional appetite for major bills are typically constrained.”  

So I guess we’re gonna wait another year before Washington gets around to (maybe) addressing our lack of long-term infrastructure fixes that guarantee federal Buy America requirements.

No matter. I’m sure President Donald Trump (who boasted of a 10-year, $1 trillion plan during his 2016 campaign) has a laser-like focus on this chronic problem. Right? What’s he up to today?

***

Reposted from AAM

Posted In: Allied Approaches, From Alliance for American Manufacturing

Union Matters

He Gets the Bucks, We Get All the Deadly Bangs

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

National Rifle Association chief Wayne LaPierre has had better weeks. First came the horrific early August slaughters in California, Texas, and Ohio that left dozens dead, murders that elevated public pressure on the NRA’s hardline against even the mildest of moves against gun violence. Then came revelations that LaPierre — whose labors on behalf of the nonprofit NRA have made him a millionaire many times over — last year planned to have his gun lobby group bankroll a 10,000-square-foot luxury manse near Dallas for his personal use. In response, LaPierre had his flacks charge that the NRA’s former ad agency had done the scheming to buy the mansion. The ad agency called that assertion “patently false” and related that LaPierre had sought the agency’s involvement in the scheme, a request the agency rejected. The mansion scandal, notes the Washington Post, comes as the NRA is already “contending with the fallout from allegations of lavish spending by top executives.”

***

More ...

Corruption Coordinates

Corruption Coordinates