Senate Floor Showdown: Sen. Sherrod Brown Blocks Anti-Section 232 Vote

Matthew McMullan

Matthew McMullan Communications Manager, Alliance for American Manufacturing

Some Senate Republicans don’t like the rationale for the Trump administration’s steel and aluminum tariffs. So much so that they’re trying to add an amendment to a spending bill that would halt any president’s ability to use that rationale without Congressional approval!

They’ve been at it for a while now, reports Politico:

[Sen. Bob Corker (R-TN) and Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA)], with a coalition of liberal, conservative and moderate senators, were rebuffed earlier this month when trying to attach their amendment to a defense bill. GOP leaders did not want to confront the president so directly, and Corker was told his amendment had procedural problems because the defense bill wasn't a revenue bill.

Though the proposal is dividing the Republican caucus that's unsure if it wants to cross its own president, it looked like the GOP Senate leadership was gonna clear the way for a vote on whether to adopt the amendment – and add it to the farm bill. Would such a farm bill pass? Who knows! The farm bill is a huge piece of legislation. But advancing that amendment would significantly increase the chances that Republican skeptics would succeed in rolling back tariffs they don’t like.

So the Senate skeptics took the floor today ...

And they were so close to getting their vote!

But then ...

Yes, that’s right: Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) objected, and made the case for keeping the tariffs – and the rationale for them – in place:

This is a big deal.

Adding Congressional approval to any Section 232 trade cases – which allow for import restrictions on national security grounds – would remove a critical trade tool, offer no replacement solution to deal with the risks caused by global industrial overcapacity, and undermine the president who – whatever you think of him – is in the middle of an attempt to rework American trade policy that has lead to surging deficits and millions of lost manufacturing jobs since 2000.

What’s more, removing Section 232 would be very bad news to the workers around the country who have seen jobs come back because of the steel and aluminum tariffs.

This is hardly the end of this debate. The critics of Section 232 are persistent, and will find a new avenue to attack this enforcement mechanism. But for the moment, Sen. Brown has turned them back.

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Reposted from AAM

Posted In: Allied Approaches, From Alliance for American Manufacturing

Union Matters

Get to Know AFL-CIO's Affiliates: National Association of Letter Carriers

From the AFL-CIO

Next up in our series that takes a deeper look at each of our affiliates is the National Association of Letter Carriers.

Name of Union: National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC)

Mission: To unite fraternally all city letter carriers employed by the U.S. Postal Service for their mutual benefit; to obtain and secure rights as employees of the USPS and to strive at all times to promote the safety and the welfare of every member; to strive for the constant improvement of the Postal Service; and for other purposes. NALC is a single-craft union and is the sole collective-bargaining agent for city letter carriers.

Current Leadership of Union: Fredric V. Rolando serves as president of NALC, after being sworn in as the union's 18th president in 2009. Rolando began his career as a letter carrier in 1978 in South Miami before moving to Sarasota in 1984. He was elected president of Branch 2148 in 1988 and served in that role until 1999. In the ensuing years, he worked in various roles for NALC before winning his election as a national officer in 2002, when he was elected director of city delivery. In 2006, he won election as executive vice president. Rolando was re-elected as NALC president in 2010, 2014 and 2018.

Brian Renfroe serves as executive vice president, Lew Drass as vice president, Nicole Rhine as secretary-treasurer, Paul Barner as assistant secretary-treasurer, Christopher Jackson as director of city delivery, Manuel L. Peralta Jr. as director of safety and health, Dan Toth as director of retired members, Stephanie Stewart as director of the Health Benefit Plan and James W. “Jim” Yates as director of life insurance.

Number of Members: 291,000 active and retired letter carriers.

Members Work As: City letter carriers.

Industries Represented: The United States Postal Service.

History: In 1794, the first letter carriers were appointed by Congress as the implementation of the new U.S. Constitution was being put into effect. By the time of the Civil War, free delivery of city mail was established and letter carriers successfully concluded a campaign for the eight-hour workday in 1888. The next year, letter carriers came together in Milwaukee and the National Association of Letter Carriers was formed.

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There is Dignity in All Work

There is Dignity in All Work