The American Labor Movement Stands Strong

From the AFL-CIO

The Supreme Court heard the Janus v. AFSCME Council 31 case this week. It was brought by the rich and powerful who are trying to take away your freedom to join in union.

The American labor movement is a family that will not be pushed around or denied. Working people pave the streets, drive the buses, educate our children, and are the first to respond in times of emergency. Working families know best what is needed to build a better life for ourselves and our loved ones.

This month marks the 50th anniversary of the historic 1968 strike in Memphis for better benefits, pay and safety on the job, marked by the poignant words “I Am a Man.”

Just like the AFSCME workers in Memphis 50 years ago, we will not back down from the struggle for justice. This past weekend, working people came together in cities across the country to support the freedom of all people to join in union. Workers are fighting back against the attacks that further rig the economic playing field and jeopardize our freedom to join and win together.

I know that together, we can stand firm to unrig the system and build a better life for working families. Sharing this graphic is a great way to show your solidarity in the fight for workers right now.

Share the image to support the right of all workers to join together in union for a better life.

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Posted In: From AFL-CIO, Union Matters

Union Matters

He Gets the Bucks, We Get All the Deadly Bangs

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

National Rifle Association chief Wayne LaPierre has had better weeks. First came the horrific early August slaughters in California, Texas, and Ohio that left dozens dead, murders that elevated public pressure on the NRA’s hardline against even the mildest of moves against gun violence. Then came revelations that LaPierre — whose labors on behalf of the nonprofit NRA have made him a millionaire many times over — last year planned to have his gun lobby group bankroll a 10,000-square-foot luxury manse near Dallas for his personal use. In response, LaPierre had his flacks charge that the NRA’s former ad agency had done the scheming to buy the mansion. The ad agency called that assertion “patently false” and related that LaPierre had sought the agency’s involvement in the scheme, a request the agency rejected. The mansion scandal, notes the Washington Post, comes as the NRA is already “contending with the fallout from allegations of lavish spending by top executives.”

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Corruption Coordinates

Corruption Coordinates