The Clock is Ticking, Mr. President

Richard Cucarese
USW Local 4889

There was a time during the history of America that our elected officials did their best to act expeditiously on the behalf of their constituents when it came to dealing with the ‘hot button’ issues of the day.

But over the past few decades especially, the most important issues seem to be pushed aside in the interest of partisan politics and media posturing while the proletariat suffers under the weight of indecision.  Within this framework of political grandstanding, the Section 232 cases for the steel and aluminum industries are no exception.

Contending these measures that would help save the industries and create jobs in these vitally important sectors, candidate Donald Trump used Section 232 as a dangling carrot to a workforce that has recently become resentful of presidents whom we thought were our allies promising us job security, only to have them deliver a hard slap to the face by decimating our ranks under the guise and false promises of the benefits of Free Trade.

Riding into the White House with not much wiggle room to have a mandate, President Trump still acknowledged that one of his key achievements would be to move along Section 232 expeditiously in the interests of national security due to their level of importance in the military sector and the resurrection of our once-mighty but now-crumbling national infrastructure.

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and the president set a date for delivery of 232 for mid-June, creating a buzz around the domestic steel companies and their workers that their long-ignored issues would finally be addressed.

Unfortunately, for the two industries, which combined employ more than 180,000 workers and support the livelihoods of another million and a half, the Trump Administration decided it was more important to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, foist a tax reduction plan on the American people that seems to benefit only Wall Street and large corporations, and cajole Premier Xi this past July during bilateral talks instead of confront him.

And the truly sad part is that although the Commerce Department has finally sent its report to the White House, seven months after its targeted due date, President Trump’s and Secretary Ross’ unnecessary dawdling has exacted a toll on domestic steel corporations, who’ve watched imports increase 21% this year. That forced some steel facilities to either idle or cease operations, thus ushering in a new wave of job losses.  Domestic aluminum producers haven’t fared much better. 

Ten years ago there were 22 smelters, now only five are in operation, with one possibly slated to close its doors, even though this is an industry that’s incredibly vital to national defense. 

President Trump now has 90 days to act. He’ll do it in less time if he’s truly serious.

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Posted In: Union Matters

Union Matters

He Gets the Bucks, We Get All the Deadly Bangs

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

National Rifle Association chief Wayne LaPierre has had better weeks. First came the horrific early August slaughters in California, Texas, and Ohio that left dozens dead, murders that elevated public pressure on the NRA’s hardline against even the mildest of moves against gun violence. Then came revelations that LaPierre — whose labors on behalf of the nonprofit NRA have made him a millionaire many times over — last year planned to have his gun lobby group bankroll a 10,000-square-foot luxury manse near Dallas for his personal use. In response, LaPierre had his flacks charge that the NRA’s former ad agency had done the scheming to buy the mansion. The ad agency called that assertion “patently false” and related that LaPierre had sought the agency’s involvement in the scheme, a request the agency rejected. The mansion scandal, notes the Washington Post, comes as the NRA is already “contending with the fallout from allegations of lavish spending by top executives.”

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Corruption Coordinates

Corruption Coordinates