Want A Stronger Economy? Try Collective Bargaining

By Bethany Swanson
USW Intern

Well established collective bargaining systems improve wages, working conditions, and economic equality. They also can protect the economy as a whole against downturns.

These were the findings of a study published last week by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), an intergovernmental agency founded after WWII, dedicated to improving economic and social conditions for workers across the globe.

Yet collective bargaining systems are facing serious challenges in many OECD countries, which make it unsurprising that the study also revealed that even with the unemployment rate decreasing, wage growth remains lower than it was before the recession in nearly every OECD country.

In the United States, which ranks at the bottom for both collective bargaining and worker security, workers are especially vulnerable.

The OECD found that countries like the United States that have decentralized collective bargaining systems generally have slower job growth and higher unemployment than other advanced nations. It also concluded that low paying jobs can create a slowdown in productivity and a sluggish economy.

Out of the 36 countries represented by OECD, the United States is currently ranked at the bottom for employee protection. The United States also has one of the highest job displacement rates at 16.4 percent and is in one of the highest percentiles for a low income rate, or households that earn less than half of the median outcome, creating a higher level of income equality than almost any other advanced nation in the world.

At one point unions represented nearly one-third of American workers; in 2017 however, only 10.7 percent of workers were covered by collective bargaining. With the decline of unions, workers are left to face serious challenges including unfair global competition and lack of government support on their own.

When workers have the opportunity to unionize, the OECD discovered, there is more room for personal and economic growth, with more training options and more opportunities for career advancement. Being able to collectively bargain doesn’t only strengthen workers, it also strengthens the economy as a whole.

If the American economy is going to continue to grow and workers prosper, there needs to be a place for organized labor. As this study proves, the ability to collectively bargain is one of the best solutions for improving the lives of workers everywhere.

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Posted In: Union Matters

Union Matters

He Gets the Bucks, We Get All the Deadly Bangs

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

National Rifle Association chief Wayne LaPierre has had better weeks. First came the horrific early August slaughters in California, Texas, and Ohio that left dozens dead, murders that elevated public pressure on the NRA’s hardline against even the mildest of moves against gun violence. Then came revelations that LaPierre — whose labors on behalf of the nonprofit NRA have made him a millionaire many times over — last year planned to have his gun lobby group bankroll a 10,000-square-foot luxury manse near Dallas for his personal use. In response, LaPierre had his flacks charge that the NRA’s former ad agency had done the scheming to buy the mansion. The ad agency called that assertion “patently false” and related that LaPierre had sought the agency’s involvement in the scheme, a request the agency rejected. The mansion scandal, notes the Washington Post, comes as the NRA is already “contending with the fallout from allegations of lavish spending by top executives.”

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Corruption Coordinates

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