Will GM Weather This Bad Publicity Storm?

Matthew McMullan

Matthew McMullan Communications Manager, Alliance for American Manufacturing

GM has caught a lot of heat in the last few weeks after announcing its plans to shut down five facilities in North America (four in the United States and one in Canada) and shed approximately 14,800 workers. The company claims it’s a restructuring effort to preserve cash and accelerate investment in electric and autonomous vehicles.  

In Detroit, where the Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly plant’s closure will leave the Motor City with only one auto factory left within its borders, the economic hit – especially to the enclave municipality of Hamtramck – will be severe. Some Michiganders don’t seem too sad to see them go ...

... while some residents are even openly wondering if the neighborhood that was razed in the early 80's to build GM’s facility can now be revived.

In Lordstown, Ohio, home to a facility that currently makes the Chevy Cruze, the community is laying out to keep auto manufacturing in town. Schoolkids are writing letters. Elon Musk (the guy in the middle) is musing about buying the plant. State lawmakers are bending GM CEO Mary Barra’s well-compensated ear (she says she’ll keep an “open mind”), and some federal representatives are at odds with President Trump about whether the company deserves to lose the benefits of tax credits pulled.

All in all, It’s not a good look for General Motors, which took $49.5 billion from the governmentjust a decade ago to avoid bankruptcy, and saved approximately $150 million through its third fiscal quarter off this year's Republican tax cut, to now lay off almost 15,000 American employees.

But, there’s a bit of good news for the company! The ongoing trade negotiations between the Trump administration and the Chinese government have reportedly produced lower Chinese import tariffs on automobiles. That has caused GM’s stock to rise.

Good thing, I guess, that those who own GM stock aren’t being harmed by this, unlike the thousands of American workers who will likely soon be out of work.

***

Reposted from AAM

Posted In: Allied Approaches, From Alliance for American Manufacturing

Union Matters

Get to Know AFL-CIO's Affiliates: National Association of Letter Carriers

From the AFL-CIO

Next up in our series that takes a deeper look at each of our affiliates is the National Association of Letter Carriers.

Name of Union: National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC)

Mission: To unite fraternally all city letter carriers employed by the U.S. Postal Service for their mutual benefit; to obtain and secure rights as employees of the USPS and to strive at all times to promote the safety and the welfare of every member; to strive for the constant improvement of the Postal Service; and for other purposes. NALC is a single-craft union and is the sole collective-bargaining agent for city letter carriers.

Current Leadership of Union: Fredric V. Rolando serves as president of NALC, after being sworn in as the union's 18th president in 2009. Rolando began his career as a letter carrier in 1978 in South Miami before moving to Sarasota in 1984. He was elected president of Branch 2148 in 1988 and served in that role until 1999. In the ensuing years, he worked in various roles for NALC before winning his election as a national officer in 2002, when he was elected director of city delivery. In 2006, he won election as executive vice president. Rolando was re-elected as NALC president in 2010, 2014 and 2018.

Brian Renfroe serves as executive vice president, Lew Drass as vice president, Nicole Rhine as secretary-treasurer, Paul Barner as assistant secretary-treasurer, Christopher Jackson as director of city delivery, Manuel L. Peralta Jr. as director of safety and health, Dan Toth as director of retired members, Stephanie Stewart as director of the Health Benefit Plan and James W. “Jim” Yates as director of life insurance.

Number of Members: 291,000 active and retired letter carriers.

Members Work As: City letter carriers.

Industries Represented: The United States Postal Service.

History: In 1794, the first letter carriers were appointed by Congress as the implementation of the new U.S. Constitution was being put into effect. By the time of the Civil War, free delivery of city mail was established and letter carriers successfully concluded a campaign for the eight-hour workday in 1888. The next year, letter carriers came together in Milwaukee and the National Association of Letter Carriers was formed.

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There is Dignity in All Work

There is Dignity in All Work