Will the New NAFTA Make a Difference?

From the UAW

The following statement is from UAW President Gary Jones on the signing of the “New” NAFTA called USMCA:

“Before the ink hit the paper, General Motors has already signaled that the “New” NAFTA (known as USMCA) is not strong enough, as it stands today, to deter them from moving products and taking advantage of low cost labor. Quite simply, the “New” NAFTA needs more input and more work. We were hopeful that this new agreement would rein in the corporate greed that has bled manufacturing in the United States. Unfortunately, as GM’s idling of plants in Ohio, Michigan and Maryland this week showed – the “New” NAFTA, as it stands now, is not strong enough to protect American workers.

When we look at the “New” NAFTA through the eyes of workers in Lordstown, Detroit-Hamtramck, Warren, Brownstown and Maryland, do you see a better future? It is hard to see how, as the reality of the new measure failed to stop the flow of work from the US to Mexico in search of cheap labor.

Workers in Mexico are paid so little because they lack basic rights. Just yesterday, 6,000 workers at PKC – a wire harness maker – were brutally attacked for just trying to exercise their rights to join an independent union. This points out, once again, that Mexico’s labor laws are broken and demonstrates why it is so important to have an agreement that gives Mexican workers a voice on the job and better living standards to stop a wage race to the bottom.

Corporations, like GM, have revealed time and time again that they will continue to play by their own rules at the expense of workers, even after raking in record profits. Our elected leaders owe it to working families in the United States to go back to the table and make this stronger, tighter and enforceable. We need the “New” NAFTA to make GM and other auto companies rethink mass layoffs while they invest in exploited labor in other countries like Mexico.

The UAW is committed to offering suggestions and working with the Trump Administration and Congress so that no U.S. worker ever experiences the dark Monday that so many UAW members experienced this week.

***

Reposted from the UAW

Posted In: Allied Approaches

Union Matters

Get to Know AFL-CIO's Affiliates: National Association of Letter Carriers

From the AFL-CIO

Next up in our series that takes a deeper look at each of our affiliates is the National Association of Letter Carriers.

Name of Union: National Association of Letter Carriers (NALC)

Mission: To unite fraternally all city letter carriers employed by the U.S. Postal Service for their mutual benefit; to obtain and secure rights as employees of the USPS and to strive at all times to promote the safety and the welfare of every member; to strive for the constant improvement of the Postal Service; and for other purposes. NALC is a single-craft union and is the sole collective-bargaining agent for city letter carriers.

Current Leadership of Union: Fredric V. Rolando serves as president of NALC, after being sworn in as the union's 18th president in 2009. Rolando began his career as a letter carrier in 1978 in South Miami before moving to Sarasota in 1984. He was elected president of Branch 2148 in 1988 and served in that role until 1999. In the ensuing years, he worked in various roles for NALC before winning his election as a national officer in 2002, when he was elected director of city delivery. In 2006, he won election as executive vice president. Rolando was re-elected as NALC president in 2010, 2014 and 2018.

Brian Renfroe serves as executive vice president, Lew Drass as vice president, Nicole Rhine as secretary-treasurer, Paul Barner as assistant secretary-treasurer, Christopher Jackson as director of city delivery, Manuel L. Peralta Jr. as director of safety and health, Dan Toth as director of retired members, Stephanie Stewart as director of the Health Benefit Plan and James W. “Jim” Yates as director of life insurance.

Number of Members: 291,000 active and retired letter carriers.

Members Work As: City letter carriers.

Industries Represented: The United States Postal Service.

History: In 1794, the first letter carriers were appointed by Congress as the implementation of the new U.S. Constitution was being put into effect. By the time of the Civil War, free delivery of city mail was established and letter carriers successfully concluded a campaign for the eight-hour workday in 1888. The next year, letter carriers came together in Milwaukee and the National Association of Letter Carriers was formed.

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There is Dignity in All Work

There is Dignity in All Work