AFGE: Trump Plan to Trash Govt. Personnel Agency Would Politicize Civil Service

Mark Gruenberg

Mark Gruenberg Editor, Press Associates Union News

Republican President Donald Trump’s plan to abolish the government’s central personnel agency and put most of its authority in the hands of unaccountable White House aides would politicize the U.S. civil service, the head of the largest federal workers union says.

And Government Employees President (AFGE) J. David Cox’s warning got a sympathetic hearing from majority Democrats on the House Government Operations subcommittee on May 21. Panel Republicans gave Trump tepid support, at best.

"The plan to abolish OPM is reckless, ill-conceived, and potentially dangerous,” Cox testified. “It is potentially dangerous because without a separate personnel agency, there is no formal institutional structure to protect and defend the apolitical civil service from an administration intent on politicization.”

Trump wants to abolish the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), which is in effect the government’s HR department, overseeing its two million workers. He would split its duties between the Executive Office of the President -- within the White House -- and the General Services Administration, which manages federal buildings, furniture and supplies.

The new personnel chief would be a White House staffer, unaccountable to Congress, workers, unions or the public for trashing federal workers.

Trump’s scheme, previously hinted at in his budgets, is in line with the hard-right anti-worker ideology and actions of both the right-wing president and his extremist anti-worker advisors, many of them drawn from the notorious Heritage Foundation. Cox noted Trump drew it up without consulting anyone else – including workers and unions -- outside his inner circle.

Besides freezing federal workers’ pay and demanding mass cuts, Trump infamously locked out almost 400,000 federal workers for seven weeks, and forced another 400,000 to toil without pay.

Disregarding the suffering he caused to the feds, their families and their communities, Trump used the lockout in a vain effort to force Congress to kowtow to his demand for billions of dollars to build a wall at the Mexican border. 

One unpaid Transportation Security Officer – an airport screener – depressed because he couldn’t feed his family or pay his bills, jumped to his death from the eighth floor of the Tampa Airport’s interior hotel.

What Trump’s plan wouldn’t do is increase morale among federal workers – thousands of whom have quit in frustration since Trump took over – or improve efficiency. Trump’s plan wouldn’t even save any money, witnesses said, as the feds would have to shell out millions of extra dollars in severance pay to more workers who quit.

Cox added Trump presented “no ‘business case’ or other type of analysis of costs, rationale, or risks of abolishing OPM” and moving its functions into the White House. “It is ill-conceived because there has been no consideration of how the plan would affect the sub-stantive work currently performed by OPM” overseeing federal workers and working conditions.

Ken Thomas, whose National Association of Retired Federal Employees speaks for retirees, agreed. He noted OPM manages their pensions and other benefits gained after a lifetime of working for the public – and politicization would endanger that.

“OPM’s critical mission is managing and promoting our nation’s smart and talented government workforce – a workforce that could be subject to political persecutions and non-merit-based actions” should Trump succeed, Thomas said.

The subcommittee’s majority Democrats agreed.

“This is about the administration’s plan to eliminate the independence of the civil service,” said the chair, Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., whose suburban D.C. district includes thousands of civil servants.

“The administration wants to take away merit policy functions and put them into the highly politicized environment of the White House, away from congressional oversight and inspector general review. The administration decided a priori to undermine civil service protections” against politicization “and developed this reorganization to obscure its objective,” he said.

Witnesses touched on the history of the civil service, and the objective of isolating federal workers from depending on party allegiances for their jobs. Republican President Chester Arthur got Congress to establish the first civil service in 1883. It replaced the spoils system.

Though they did not say so, Arthur acted after disgruntled and insane office-seeker Charles Guiteau, irate that Arthur’s predecessor, James Garfield, wouldn’t use spoils to give him a top diplomatic job, fatally shot Garfield in a D.C. train station two years before.

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Posted In: Allied Approaches

Union Matters

An Invitation to Sunny Miami. What Could Be Bad?

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

If a billionaire “invites” you somewhere, you’d better go. Or be prepared to suffer the consequences. This past May, hedge fund kingpin Carl Icahn announced in a letter to his New York-based staff of about 50 that he would be moving his business operations to Florida. But the 83-year-old Icahn assured his staffers they had no reason to worry: “My employees have always been very important to the company, so I’d like to invite you all to join me in Miami.” Those who go south, his letter added, would get a $50,000 relocation benefit “once you have established your permanent residence in Florida.” Those who stay put, the letter continued, can file for state unemployment benefits, a $450 weekly maximum that “you can receive for a total of 26 weeks.” What about severance from Icahn Enterprises? The New York Post reported last week that the two dozen employees who have chosen not to uproot their families and follow Icahn to Florida “will be let go without any severance” when the billionaire shutters his New York offices this coming March. Bloomberg currently puts Carl Icahn’s net worth at $20.5 billion.

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