An App That Makes Supporting Pro-Union Goods and Services Easier

Jesús Espinoza

Jesús Espinoza Press Secretary, AAM

The internet has made it easier than ever to find goods and services. But this unprecedented access to options also means that we as consumers must do more research if we want to buy or use services that are ethical.  

An important way in which we could all become more ethical consumers is buying union-made products and using pro-union services. The thing is it’s not always clear what goods or services support good-paying, union jobs.

Finding ways to support good jobs has now become much easier with Labor 411’s new app.

For over a decade, Labor 411 has been “supporting businesses that treat their employees well with fair pay, good benefits and safe working conditions” by highlighting them in their online and print directories. With these valuable resources, Labor 411 connects ethical businesses with conscious consumers. The app now makes their renowned online directories easily accessible in the palm of your hand.

In a statement announcing the app, Labor 411 founder and President Cherri Senders said:

“Labor 411 has always maintained that making smart, ethical choices every time you open your wallet is easy. The 411 App makes the process that much easier.”

With over 11,000 listings, Labor 411 points you in the right direction for everything from restaurants and hotels to gifts and clothes. Although their app focuses on the nation’s largest consumer markets, you can find plenty of businesses that offer good and services nationally.

Labor 411 partners with labor councils in Los Angeles (where it’s based), San Francisco, Washington DC, Philadelphia and New York City to ensure that listings are accurate and verified. 

Visit Labor 411’s website for more information on its new app, now available for Apple and Android. Download it today and make sure to share it with your friends and family!

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Reposted from AAM

Posted In: Allied Approaches, From Alliance for American Manufacturing

Union Matters

Federal Minimum Wage Reaches Disappointing Milestone

By Kathleen Mackey
USW Intern

A disgraceful milestone occurred last Sunday, June 16.

That date officially marked the longest period that the United States has gone without increasing federal the minimum wage.

That means Congress has denied raises for a decade to 1.8 million American workers, that is, those workers who earn $7.25 an hour or less. These 1.8 million Americans have watched in frustration as Congress not only denied them wages increases, but used their tax dollars to raise Congressional pay. They continued to watch in disappointment as the Trump administration failed to keep its promise that the 2017 tax cut law would increase every worker’s pay by $4,000 per year.

More than 12 years ago, in May 2007, Congress passed legislation to raise the minimum wage to $7.25 per hour. It took effect two years later. Congress has failed to act since then, so it has, in effect, now imposed a decade-long wage freeze on the nation’s lowest income workers.

To combat this unjust situation, minimum wage workers could rally and call their lawmakers to demand action, but they’re typically working more than one job just to get by, so few have the energy or patience.

The Economic Policy Institute points out in a recent report on the federal minimum wage that as the cost of living rose over the past 10 years, Congress’ inaction cut the take-home pay of working families.  

At the current dismal rate, full-time workers receiving minimum wage earn $15,080 a year. It was virtually impossible to scrape by on $15,080 a decade ago, let alone support a family. But with the cost of living having risen 18% over that time, the situation now is far worse for the working poor. The current federal minimum wage is not a living wage. And no full-time worker should live in poverty.

While ignoring the needs of low-income workers, members of Congress, who taxpayers pay at least $174,000 a year, are scheduled to receive an automatic $4,500 cost-of-living raise this year. Congress increased its own pay from $169,300 to $174,000 in 2009, in the middle of the Great Recession when low income people across the country were out of work and losing their homes. While Congress has frozen its own pay since then, that’s little consolation to minimum wage workers who take home less than a tenth of Congressional salaries.

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A Friendly Reminder

A Friendly Reminder