Pet Body Armor: Protect Your Furry Friends With This Tough American-Made Vest

Jesús Espinoza

Jesús Espinoza Press Secretary, AAM

Growing up in the Southwest, you get used to seeing coyotes prowling around yards and driveways at dawn and dusk. You know to keep your distance, but our four-legged friends don’t always get the memo. 

In 2016, the Espinoza family had a close call. During an early morning walk, our 9-year-old Jack Russell Terrier, Chiquita (like the bananas!), lunged at some bushes along a wilderness trail. It turns out a coyote was lurking in the brush -- maybe waiting for its next meal.

After a terrifying brawl, the coyote fled. To our surprise, Chiquita ran back with minor bite marks that landed her in a vet-ordered quarantine for 10 days for potential rabies. She ended up fine, but it was too close a call.

Sadly, not everyone’s pooch is so lucky. For Paul Mott, Pam Mott and Nicole Mellom, the loss of their beloved Buffy to a coyote was an unforgettable tragedy. But they soon turned tragedy into something inspiring. They went on to create CoyoteVest: Pet Body Armor.

These lightweight, American-made Kevlar vests are studded with sturdy metal spikes and flexible plastic whiskers to keep coyotes, and even raptors, at a distance.

As Chiquita’s vet said after the attack, coyotes usually aim for the backs and necks of smaller animals. The CoyoteVest shields those exposed areas, so predators aren’t tempted to get an inch closer.

The vest could mean the difference between life and death. They start at $69.95 -- a worthy investment to keep your lovable pets safe. Read what CoyoteVest users have to say here, and find the perfect fit for your furry friend on their website.

Next time you see or hear a coyote in your neighborhood, know that protection for your small pets is only a few clicks away.

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Reposted from AAM

Posted In: Allied Approaches, From Alliance for American Manufacturing

Union Matters

Federal Minimum Wage Reaches Disappointing Milestone

By Kathleen Mackey
USW Intern

A disgraceful milestone occurred last Sunday, June 16.

That date officially marked the longest period that the United States has gone without increasing federal the minimum wage.

That means Congress has denied raises for a decade to 1.8 million American workers, that is, those workers who earn $7.25 an hour or less. These 1.8 million Americans have watched in frustration as Congress not only denied them wages increases, but used their tax dollars to raise Congressional pay. They continued to watch in disappointment as the Trump administration failed to keep its promise that the 2017 tax cut law would increase every worker’s pay by $4,000 per year.

More than 12 years ago, in May 2007, Congress passed legislation to raise the minimum wage to $7.25 per hour. It took effect two years later. Congress has failed to act since then, so it has, in effect, now imposed a decade-long wage freeze on the nation’s lowest income workers.

To combat this unjust situation, minimum wage workers could rally and call their lawmakers to demand action, but they’re typically working more than one job just to get by, so few have the energy or patience.

The Economic Policy Institute points out in a recent report on the federal minimum wage that as the cost of living rose over the past 10 years, Congress’ inaction cut the take-home pay of working families.  

At the current dismal rate, full-time workers receiving minimum wage earn $15,080 a year. It was virtually impossible to scrape by on $15,080 a decade ago, let alone support a family. But with the cost of living having risen 18% over that time, the situation now is far worse for the working poor. The current federal minimum wage is not a living wage. And no full-time worker should live in poverty.

While ignoring the needs of low-income workers, members of Congress, who taxpayers pay at least $174,000 a year, are scheduled to receive an automatic $4,500 cost-of-living raise this year. Congress increased its own pay from $169,300 to $174,000 in 2009, in the middle of the Great Recession when low income people across the country were out of work and losing their homes. While Congress has frozen its own pay since then, that’s little consolation to minimum wage workers who take home less than a tenth of Congressional salaries.

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