SEC Must Tame the Wolves of Wall Street

From the AFL-CIO

Future retirees stand to lose one-quarter of their retirement paychecks because of corrupt financial advice.

Advocates have been fighting for decades to close a loophole that allows investment brokers to give self-serving advice. On Wednesday the Securities and Exchange Commission proposed a new rule that doesn’t go far enough to protect the interests of working people. The SEC should go further and require brokers to act with integrity.

A new proposed rule on investment advice would leave working people vulnerable to bad actors on Wall Street, and the AFL-CIO will fight for a stronger rule before it’s finalized or demand it to be scrapped altogether.

“Does this proposal require financial professionals to put their customers’ interests first, and fully and fairly disclose any conflicting interests? No,” said SEC Commissioner Kara Stein, explaining why she voted against the proposal.

“Americans deserve a clear best-interest rule that places the client’s needs ahead of the broker’s. Period,” said fellow Commissioner Robert J. Jackson Jr., who’s fighting to improve the proposal.

Working people want new economic rules that stop investment brokers from skimming our savings, so more working people can have a secure retirement.

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Posted In: Union Matters

Union Matters

He Gets the Bucks, We Get All the Deadly Bangs

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

National Rifle Association chief Wayne LaPierre has had better weeks. First came the horrific early August slaughters in California, Texas, and Ohio that left dozens dead, murders that elevated public pressure on the NRA’s hardline against even the mildest of moves against gun violence. Then came revelations that LaPierre — whose labors on behalf of the nonprofit NRA have made him a millionaire many times over — last year planned to have his gun lobby group bankroll a 10,000-square-foot luxury manse near Dallas for his personal use. In response, LaPierre had his flacks charge that the NRA’s former ad agency had done the scheming to buy the mansion. The ad agency called that assertion “patently false” and related that LaPierre had sought the agency’s involvement in the scheme, a request the agency rejected. The mansion scandal, notes the Washington Post, comes as the NRA is already “contending with the fallout from allegations of lavish spending by top executives.”

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Corruption Coordinates

Corruption Coordinates