The kindly 87-year-old man who took all the school kids’ lunch money

Paul Buchheit

Paul Buchheit Author, editor, expert on income inequality

He seems to stand out as the one beloved billionaire among us, a man who admitted he doesn’t need a tax cut and promised much of his fortune to charity.

But Warren Buffett’s company, Berkshire Hathaway, hasn’t paid much in real taxes over the years, choosing to defer $77 billion through the end of 2016. And now the company has taken advantage of the Trump tax law to claim a $23 billion 2017 federal tax benefit, ironically the same amount as the cost of the Child Nutrition Programs, which provide school lunches and other nutritional needs for millions of America’s children.

Paying hypothetical taxes until the tax bill expires

Berkshire Hathaway has declared nearly $200 billion in U.S. income over the past ten years, but including the 2017 writeoff has paid only $16 billion in current (non-deferred) taxes. The company’s annual tax obligation has been announced to shareholders as satisfied by a “hypothetical” tax payment. Now, suddenly, with Trump’s corporate tax break, $23 billion of its deferred tax liability just fades away, never to be paid, never to be used for the vital public services that are dependent on tax revenue.

Other financial institutions: Turning tax bills into assets

Berkshire Hathaway is not the only Big Finance tax avoider. Bank of America and Goldman Sachs together underpaid their current U.S. federal income taxes by about $5 billion in 2017 (almost $10 billion at the old tax rate). The information about their tax avoidance is taken from 2017 SEC 10-K filings. Details are here.

Here’s the bankers’ excuse for tax trickery: Deferred Tax Assets, which are writeoffs against previous losses (specifically due to the 2008 recession) or advance payments on their tax bills. But an examination of their 10-Ks over the past 12 years shows that both companies made profits every year since 2006 (with the exception of relatively small losses for Bank of America between 2010-11), and that they never paid more than the required 35% tax rate, and sometimes paid much less. Goldman Sachs reported a 61% tax rate for 2017, but almost all of it was deferred, and their announced tax was grossly inflated by a one-time (and relatively small) tax expense on a very large repatriation of offshore money.

As for any mysterious writeoffs against recession-related losses, Business Insider notes: “The banks did not actually lose money during the crisis. [It] is the difference between what the banks made during the last five-year crisis period compared to what they would have made if they would have continued to make money at the rate they did prior to the crisis.” Any losses that might be claimed by these financial institutions are imaginary losses, according to their own SEC filings.

The great disgrace: Billions in benefits from society, but they cheat the kids anyway

There seems to be no corporate recognition of the shameful act of taking decades of societal largesse and then doing everything possible to avoid paying for any of it. Financial institutions are the beneficiaries of decades of public support:

  1. Technology: Internet-related stock market trading and communications.
  2. Finance and Law: Patent and copyright systems, intellectual property, contract law.
  3. The Military: National defense, local police forces, the National Guard.
  4. Infrastructure: In the physical form of highways, railroads, airports; the energy grid; the communications grid.
  5. Federal Agencies: The Federal Reserve, SEC, FTC, SBA, FAA.

Taxes are long overdue on tens of billions in profits, but they remain unpaid, or deferred to some unknown time in the future.

But food for the children can’t be deferred.

***

Reposted from Nation of Change

Paul Buchheit teaches economic inequality at DePaul University. He is the founder and developer of the Web sites UsAgainstGreed.org, PayUpNow.org and RappingHistory.org, and the editor and main author of “American Wars: Illusions and Realities” (Clarity Press). He can be reached at paul@UsAgainstGreed.org.

Posted In: Allied Approaches

Union Matters

Federal Minimum Wage Reaches Disappointing Milestone

By Kathleen Mackey
USW Intern

A disgraceful milestone occurred last Sunday, June 16.

That date officially marked the longest period that the United States has gone without increasing federal the minimum wage.

That means Congress has denied raises for a decade to 1.8 million American workers, that is, those workers who earn $7.25 an hour or less. These 1.8 million Americans have watched in frustration as Congress not only denied them wages increases, but used their tax dollars to raise Congressional pay. They continued to watch in disappointment as the Trump administration failed to keep its promise that the 2017 tax cut law would increase every worker’s pay by $4,000 per year.

More than 12 years ago, in May 2007, Congress passed legislation to raise the minimum wage to $7.25 per hour. It took effect two years later. Congress has failed to act since then, so it has, in effect, now imposed a decade-long wage freeze on the nation’s lowest income workers.

To combat this unjust situation, minimum wage workers could rally and call their lawmakers to demand action, but they’re typically working more than one job just to get by, so few have the energy or patience.

The Economic Policy Institute points out in a recent report on the federal minimum wage that as the cost of living rose over the past 10 years, Congress’ inaction cut the take-home pay of working families.  

At the current dismal rate, full-time workers receiving minimum wage earn $15,080 a year. It was virtually impossible to scrape by on $15,080 a decade ago, let alone support a family. But with the cost of living having risen 18% over that time, the situation now is far worse for the working poor. The current federal minimum wage is not a living wage. And no full-time worker should live in poverty.

While ignoring the needs of low-income workers, members of Congress, who taxpayers pay at least $174,000 a year, are scheduled to receive an automatic $4,500 cost-of-living raise this year. Congress increased its own pay from $169,300 to $174,000 in 2009, in the middle of the Great Recession when low income people across the country were out of work and losing their homes. While Congress has frozen its own pay since then, that’s little consolation to minimum wage workers who take home less than a tenth of Congressional salaries.

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A Friendly Reminder

A Friendly Reminder