The Shutdown’s Devastating Ripple Effects

From the AFL-CIO

More than a month after it ended, the government lockout continues to hurt working people: More than 1,000 Transportation Security Administration agents still haven’t received back pay, and it’s unclear when they will be made whole.

More than 1 million federal employees and contractors were devastated by the record-breaking 35-day shutdown, including TSA agents, who are among the lowest paid federal employees, earning an average of $37,000 a year—not enough to afford a two-bedroom apartment in the top 20 major U.S. cities.

Now, reports have surfaced that more than 1,000 TSA agents are still waiting for back pay.

During the shutdown, food banks in cities across the country were busier than usual, with some serving as many as five times the average number of visitors. Federal workers missed $2 billion in pay each pay period of the shutdown.

To make matters worse, more than 1 million federal contractors lost a month of paychecks during the lockout and, unless Congress acts, they will never receive that pay.

 “The law says we are entitled to our paychecks in a timely basis and that did not happen this time around. We just can't be held hostage to solve political disputes as the work we do is so important,” Victor Payes, a TSA agent in Los Angeles told NBC Washington.

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Posted In: Union Matters

Union Matters

He Gets the Bucks, We Get All the Deadly Bangs

Sam Pizzigati

Sam Pizzigati Editor, Too Much online magazine

National Rifle Association chief Wayne LaPierre has had better weeks. First came the horrific early August slaughters in California, Texas, and Ohio that left dozens dead, murders that elevated public pressure on the NRA’s hardline against even the mildest of moves against gun violence. Then came revelations that LaPierre — whose labors on behalf of the nonprofit NRA have made him a millionaire many times over — last year planned to have his gun lobby group bankroll a 10,000-square-foot luxury manse near Dallas for his personal use. In response, LaPierre had his flacks charge that the NRA’s former ad agency had done the scheming to buy the mansion. The ad agency called that assertion “patently false” and related that LaPierre had sought the agency’s involvement in the scheme, a request the agency rejected. The mansion scandal, notes the Washington Post, comes as the NRA is already “contending with the fallout from allegations of lavish spending by top executives.”

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Corruption Coordinates

Corruption Coordinates